Expanding Global Surgery - PGSSC (Fall 2017)

Expanding Global Surgery - PGSSC (Fall 2017)

Client Profile

The Program on Global Surgery and Social Change (PGSSC) is a collaborative effort between the Harvard teaching hospitals, Harvard Medical School/ Department of Global Health and Social Medicine, Boston Children’s Hospital (BCH) and Partners In Health (PIH).  This organization emerges out of work of the Lancet Commission on Global Surgery, that was led by Dr. John Meara at Harvard Medical School (and a 1986 ND graduate).  PGSSC’s objective is to advocate for Universal access to safe, affordable surgical and anesthesia care when needed. Their  strategy is two-fold:

  • Global Surgical Systems Strengthening through Research, Advocacy, and Implementation Science, using the Frameworks developed as part of the Lancet Commission on Global Surgery.       

  • Developing Leaders in Global Surgical and Health Systems through Research, Advocacy, and Care Delivery.  

PGSSC research focuses on surgical and health systems strengthening that is measurable, transparent, and locally-driven. 

 

Initial Ideas & Options

PGSSC has been opportunistic about the issues and countries where they have engaged, trying to take best use of the capacity they have to promote their strategic objectives. The PGSSC is interested, in its planning for the future, to explore and expand partnerships with international development and health organizations, such as Partners In Health and the World Health Organization, as well as universities, such as the Harvard Medical School and the University of Notre Dame, consistent with its strategic objectives.

 

Definition of Success

The development of a set of future scenarios or pathways that PGSSC might explore for potential partnerships, as well as the strategic use of their experience, expertise, and capacity to maximize their organization’s impact in the future.

 

Accompanying the Migrant through Mexico - USCCB (Fall 2017)

Accompanying the Migrant through Mexico - USCCB (Fall 2017)

Client Profile

The US Conference on Catholic Bishops’ (USCCB) Committee on Migration sets broad policies and direction for the Church's work in the area of migration. The Committee oversees and provides guidance to Migration and Refugee Services, which is comprised of five offices: 

These offices represent the bishops' interests in policy formulation and communication, advocacy, education, refugee resettlement, and other specialized services to at risk and vulnerable populations, such as victims of trafficking and unaccompanied minors. The Committee actively promotes migration-related interests with public policy-makers at the national and international levels. Committee members and staff periodically testify before Congress and meet with Administration officials to advocate the bishops' positions. Among the high priority policy concerns of the Committee is refugee protection and finding durable solutions to their plight. In this context the Committee occasionally arranges site visits to refugee areas of the world to witness the conditions of the refugees and to call for adequate responses on the part of the international community.

Definition of Problem

The summer of 2014 witnessed a significant uptick in the number of unaccompanied migrant children and families who originated in the Northern Triangle countries of Central America. While an average of 6,800 unaccompanied children were apprehended in each year from 2004 – 2011, the number jumped to roughly 13,000 children in Fiscal Year 2012 and rose to just over 38,000 in 2013. 68,541 unaccompanied children were detained in FY 2014 and, although a decrease was evident the following year (39,970), the numbers again increased in FY2016 (59,692). Family units experienced a similar ebb and flow in total numbers during this same period.

Although an array of Catholic, non-Catholic religious, and secular immigrant welcoming centers function throughout Mexico, the number of Catholic centers is the largest. The institutional Church alone coordinates seventy-five welcoming centers and, in addition, there are the number of centers run by religious orders and local Catholic institutions. Determining how many there are, where they are located, what services they provide, to whom they provide it, etc., is not entirely clear.

Initial Ideas & Options

Due to the size and complexity of the network, important advocacy and service-oriented efforts are constantly evolving; getting a better handle on where these centers are and efforts they are engaged in in support of migrants will provide much needed information to fill existing gaps in our knowledge.

Definition of Success

This effort will help to respond to the challenges of (1) ensuring enduring communication with what is an extremely mobile population; (2) the need for institutional mapping; and (3) scaling up capacity of the existing network. It would also be of interest to find out how the Mexican government is responding to these efforts, and whether policies are in place that would either support or inhibit their work.

Behind the brands - Oxfam America (Fall 2017)

Behind the brands - Oxfam America (Fall 2017)

Client Profile

Oxfam is a global movement of people working together to end the injustice of poverty. With 70 years of experience in more than 90 countries, Oxfam takes on the big issues that keep people poor: inequality, discrimination, and unequal access to resources including food, water, and land. We help people save lives in disasters, build stronger futures for themselves, and hold the powerful accountable.

In 2013, Oxfam launched the Behind the Brands (BtB) campaign to challenge the ‘Big 10’ food and beverage companies on their social and environmental policies and practices, and to amplify the voices of key stakeholders such as farmers, workers, communities, consumers and investors calling on them to take action. The Big 10 companies include: ABF/Illovo, The Coca-Cola Company, Danone, General Mills, Kellogg, Mars, Inc., Mondelez, Nestle, PepsiCo, and Unilever.

Over the last few years of the campaign companies have made significant new commitments to improve social and environmental standards in their supply chains. Oxfam is currently planning deepened engagement with companies to ensure that their business units and suppliers make progress in line with commitments, and to accelerate the transformation towards a more sustainable, equitable food system that empowers in particular smallholders and women (“BtB 1.1”). We additionally aim to encourage all supply chain stakeholders including the Behind the Brands companies to go further and to adopt new business models that ensure that more of the power and the value reach the farmers and workers within the chain, in particular women farmers and smallholders.  

Definition of Problem

The aim is to catalyze transformational change from the company all the way down to the farm in source countries. It includes four intertwined strategies: 1) Engagement with companies on implementation of commitments; 2) Extend commitments to associated traders in company supply chains; 3) Drive transformative change, hold companies accountable, and create new models for change in six target countries; and 4) Establish better food sector governance.  The target countries include Brazil, Ghana, India, Indonesia, Malawi and Thailand.

The proposal is for a team of students to conduct research and evaluation activities that support the BtB 1.1. Monitoring, Evaluation and Learning (MEL) framework. The MEL framework allows Oxfam to track the impacts of commitments down to the ground in priority countries.  The overall objective is to reach and begin improving the lives and livelihoods of millions of small-scale producers, workers and communities by 2020, with specific milestones identified for the key themes (gender, climate, land, small-scale producers); by strategy (company engagement, trader engagement, country engagement and global agrifood systems).  

The aim not just to monitor Oxfam performance, but to contribute to the emerging field of how corporate contributions and supply chain engagement makes a difference on the ground and in particular in the lives of poor people, and in particular the rural poor (farmers) and women.  The MEL framework is designed to demonstrate progress towards exploitation free, more equitable supply chains, in a way that documents both actions attributable to Oxfam and broader changes catalyzed by these actions that are instrumental in shifting key company, trader and supplier practices towards a future that is exploitation free and more equitable.  The framework establishes rigorous indicators that demonstrate or document the number of people reached by Big Ten brand companies and traders, and better protected in theory by corporate-level commitments (e.g. all producers/workers in their supply chains); the number of people reached by implementation of these commitments in priority countries, including those better protected through national level private sector or governmental enabling policies, and those directly engaged by Oxfam country offices; and impact evaluations that demonstrate that the approach of implementation of supply chain commitments leads to positive benefits for producers, workers and communities in priority countries.  

We believe that the ability to measure progress, and demonstrate the social and environmental impact of company commitments will not just be of value to Oxfam, but for other organizations and institutions such as foundations, governments and aid agencies that have invested in market based approaches—and, to the global companies that have made significant commitments.

Initial Ideas & Options

The Notre Dame team will trace the sugar value chain in India and/or Brazil from top (focusing on BtB companies Coca Cola and Pepsi) to bottom (following company impact assessments to the local communities affected by corporate commitments.) All work will be carried out in coordination with Oxfam program and MEL staff. 

More specifically, the team will over the  semester do a literature review exploring:

1) Produce commodity profiles for each of the three commodities (sugar, palm oil, and cocoa) in India and Brazil. The profiles should examine social, economic, environmental and political risks for each commodity in India and Brazil. They should include data on: total number of producers, total number of women and women smallholders in the supply chain, associated emissions, and reported land conflicts. The profile should characterize commodity production at the national level, and highlight key issues for land, gender, climate and smallholders.

2) Assess the extent to which the policies of BtB companies and a selection of their traders differ at the global and national levels. This baseline diagnostic of company commitments involves desk research – to be conducted prior to commencing fieldwork – and the team will source publically available documents with assistance from Oxfam staff. This comprehensive diagnostic will inform company engagement efforts, in signaling where gaps exist between global commitments and action in-country and with traders. A goal of BtB 1.1 is to ensure national policies reflect best practice.

This initial review process will serve three key purposes: 1) it will be a source of baseline data for the program MEL framework; 2) it will provide Oxfam with information it needs in its influencing efforts with the companies; and 3) it will provide the Keough School's i-Lab Global Partner Experience (GPE) team with an understanding of the company action plans and national-level variation, which will inform their later fieldwork. The diagnostic should consist of a matrix with an accompanying narrative.  The deliverable may include:

  • Data and indicators: Estimate the number of producers and local communities in company supply chains, if possible disaggregated by small-scale producers and by gender.
  • Help map the best pathways forward for the GPE team working with Oxfam in 2018

Definition of Success

Our Behind the Brands teams in both countries are now in the final stages of planning multi-year interventions. We look forward to working with a team of master’s students in 2018, and to work this coming semester engaging with an undergraduate team on the background research and content of this proposal. We welcome ideas for how to ensure students have the most meaningful experience.

Enhancing Understanding & Engagement in Accompaniment - PIH (Fall 2017)

Enhancing Understanding & Engagement in Accompaniment - PIH (Fall 2017)

Client Profile

Partners in Health (PIH) is an NGO that was founded on the principle of preferential option of the poor in healthcare. Headquartered in Boston, the organization originally developed as a single community health project in Haiti, and has since expanded throughout Haiti and into a dozen other countries including Peru, Russia, and Mexico. PIH works in partnership with governments and local communities in each of these countries. The main goals of the organization are to provide health care and education to those most in need, to work to alleviate the causes of disease, and to share the ideas and lessons learned . 

Definition of Opportunity

One of PIH’s central ideas is an approach to service through the model of accompaniment. The accompaniment approach to aid delivery is based on pragmatic solidarity with the poor.  It proposes to build long-term relationships and mandates walking side by side rather than leading.  This accompaniment model informs all of PIH's work; however, many within the organization are interested in a deeper and more meaningful understanding of the idea of accompaniment and its applications.

Initial Ideas & Options

·      Identify the key principles of accompaniment that can be shared within the organization (globally there are some 15,000 people working with PIH) to promote awareness and understanding of accompaniment and its applications. Identify the most effective training, engagement, and other modalities to help build awareness and engagement around this idea within the organization.  

·      Focus on opportunities related to the University of Notre Dame that highlight accompaniment in connection with liberation theology as seen in the book In the Company of the Poor: Conversations with Dr. Paul Farmer and Fr. Gustavo Gutiérrez.  There are mutiple opportunities for drawing from the work of past Notre Dame student teams on this topic, as well as an anticipated volume on the concept of accompaniment led by Paul Farmer, with co-editors Jennie Block and Steve Reifenberg. 

 

Definition of Success

Development and use of new, effective training materials and other ways of engaging the PIH community on the understanding and use of the concept of accompaniment in all their work.

Developing Support & Organizational Stability - EDUCATION BRIDGE (FALL 2017)

Developing Support & Organizational Stability - EDUCATION BRIDGE (FALL 2017)

Client Profile

Education Bridge seeks to create flourishing South Sudanese communities through education and peace-building.  As part of this mission, Education Bridge opened its first school, Greenbelt Academy, in Bor, South Sudan, in February 2017. Led by Notre Dame student Majak Anyieth, the Greenbelt Academy currently serves 240 students from Grades 9-10, with plans to double the school population and have grades 9-12 over the next two years. Greenbelt Academy seeks to provide quality secondary education as well as to develop a generation of South Sudanese peacemakers and transformational leaders.

Definition of Opportunity

In order to maintain and develop its services, Education Bridge must develop a sustainable business plan that includes student tuition and fees, as well as raising funds each year to cover its the remainder of its operating and investment costs.  However, because many of Greenbelt Academy students come from extremely low-income backgrounds, there is only a minimal tuition to remove financial barriers to education for students.  Education Bridge needs to develop additional revenue streams, including fundraising is through private donations and institutional grants.

Our challenge currently is that we have an ambitious set of goals, with limited funds and a relatively small support base for donations and grants. We would like to explore how to most efficiently increase our support base for donors and grants.

Initial Ideas & Options

We look forward to working with a team of Notre Dame students to research how other nonprofit organizations, especially those running educational and/or child development programs in the international context, understand and utilize different business and financial sustainability models.

1.     How do the best non-profit organizations engage and retain donors in ways are satisfying for the donor, and time and cost efficient for the organization?

2.     How do they most effectively tell their story and build partnerships with donors and organizations on an active basis that leads to regular donations/investments?

3.     How can Education Bridge draw lessons from these successful organizations, and build a  business model(s) to become more sustainable as an organization? Can Education Bridge collaborate with other partners in South Sudan, the U.S., or other countries?

Definition of Success

The development of a number of good models of sustainable organizations in the educational sector that will be relevant for Education Bridge, and proposals of concrete ideas that Education Bridge can utilize in the coming year as part of its strategic planning process to become a dynamic and sustainable organization.

Attracting Young Professionals To Teach - Enseña Chile (Fall 2017)

Attracting Young Professionals To Teach - Enseña Chile (Fall 2017)

Client Profile

Enseña Chile is based on the successful Teach for America model, recognized for creating a critical mass of leaders committed to improving access to excellent education regardless of socio-economic circumstances. The organization works in Chile to provide quality education to 14- to 18-year-old high school students by bringing for two years outstanding university graduates with leadership skills into classrooms of under-resourced schools. Enseña Chile was founded by Tomás Recart in 2007 in Santiago, Chile.  

Definition of Opportunity

Throughout the past few years, Enseña Chile has noticed a rise in the applicant numbers of young professionals who have completed two or more years of work and want to refocus their careers. Despite not having a formal recruitment strategy to address this specific population, early evidence suggest that young professionals with a few years of professional experience are more successful teachers than those who join immediately after graduating from university. While Enseña Chile is primarily focused on recent graduates, this initial evidence has Enseña Chile interested in learning ways to promote, create an interest, attract and select young professionals with work experience.

Initial ideas & Options

·      Assess the current Enseña Chile recruitment strategy for people with professional experience. Analyze existing data regarding socio demographic characteristic of applicants to gather additional insights and understand better their overall profile.

·      Research best practices in organizations with similar missions (both inside and out the educational arena) to understand how to better increase Enseña Chile's young professional applicant base.  One organization worth analyzing is Teach for America in the U.S.

Definition of Success

Identify a strategy to promote, interest, and attract young professionals to Enseña Chile. If successful in the short-term, the organization believes teacher turnover will be reduced and student achievement will improve. Ideally, many of these young professionals will continue to meaningfully fight educational inequality throughout their careers either directly or indirectly as a result of their Enseña Chile experience.

Education in Emergencies (EiE) Research - AVSI (Fall 2016)

Education in Emergencies (EiE) Research - AVSI (Fall 2016)

Client Profile

Currently operating in 30 countries, AVSI specializes in education, with deep experience in primary education in a wide array of global contexts, including complex and other emergencies. More broadly, AVSI boasts a record of demonstrated efficacy in both development and humanitarianism, including peacebuilding, water and sanitation, health, nutrition, and food security and livelihoods. Formulated over more than 40 years of development practice, the AVSI methodology is informed by Catholic Social Teachings as well as extensive organizational experience.

AVSI established a permanent presence in South Sudan in 2005 after over a decade of implementing cross-border projects from northern Uganda. It first established a field office in Ikwoto County, Eastern Equatoria State (EES), before consolidating its presence in EES with a field office in the state capital, Torit, in 2009. An administrative office in Juba followed in 2011 and a third field office in Cueibet County, Lakes State opened in 2014. In each location, AVSI has followed in the footsteps of the Catholic Church, leasing Diocesan property and, in two field offices, taking over compounds and programming previously managed by the Comboni Missionaries.

Definition of Problem

South Sudan has been a humanitarian emergency since civil war broke out between competing government factions in December 2013. In this moment, AVSI’s mission and portfolio in South Sudan remains heavily focused on long-term development activities. Given the emergency context, including the violence of July, 2016 and the ongoing aftermath, AVSI is seeking to continue improving its development work within a complex operating environment as well as address critical humanitarian needs in its geographic areas of implementation. Currently, AVSI maintains a geographic presence in an area of both chronic and acute food insecurity and high levels of refugee outflow as well as in an area with one of the highest rates of intercommunal violence, including cattle raids and revenge killings, in the country.

AVSI seeks a DAT that is capable of providing intensive background research and critical analysis of primary and secondary data in support of project design, current and future field research, and ongoing project implementation. This may range from addressing more traditional challenges of international development within a humanitarian crisis to supporting active field assessments within a rapidly evolving humanitarian crisis. AVSI seeks a DAT with strong qualitative research skills as well as high degrees of flexibility and independence. Below are three tentative projects under consideration for the DAT. AVSI proposes that the DAT undertake two of the three listed following a discussion between client and DAT.

Initial Ideas and Options

Education in Emergencies (EiE)

  1. EiE transition to long-term activities
    1. Case studies – shifting from EiE to long-term education interventions

    2. The use of EiE in slow-onset emergencies (SOE)

    3. How might community institutions related to EiE, such as a Parent-Teacher Associations or School Management Committees, contribute to community-based peacebuilding?

Definition of Success

The team should develop clear, thoughtful, well-organized and actionable research on the relevant themes that will impact AVSI’s practice.

 

Development Advisory Team 

Final Report

Intercommunal Violence Report - AVSI (Fall 2016)

Intercommunal Violence Report - AVSI (Fall 2016)

Client Profile

Currently operating in 30 countries, AVSI specializes in education, with deep experience in primary education in a wide array of global contexts, including complex and other emergencies. More broadly, AVSI boasts a record of demonstrated efficacy in both development and humanitarianism, including peacebuilding, water and sanitation, health, nutrition, and food security and livelihoods. Formulated over more than 40 years of development practice, the AVSI methodology is informed by Catholic Social Teachings as well as extensive organizational experience.

AVSI established a permanent presence in South Sudan in 2005 after over a decade of implementing cross-border projects from northern Uganda. It first established a field office in Ikwoto County, Eastern Equatoria State (EES), before consolidating its presence in EES with a field office in the state capital, Torit, in 2009. An administrative office in Juba followed in 2011 and a third field office in Cueibet County, Lakes State opened in 2014. In each location, AVSI has followed in the footsteps of the Catholic Church, leasing Diocesan property and, in two field offices, taking over compounds and programming previously managed by the Comboni Missionaries. 

Definition of Problem

South Sudan has been a humanitarian emergency since civil war broke out between competing government factions in December 2013. In this moment, AVSI’s mission and portfolio in South Sudan remains heavily focused on long-term development activities. Given the emergency context, including the violence of July, 2016 and the ongoing aftermath, AVSI is seeking to continue improving its development work within a complex operating environment as well as address critical humanitarian needs in its geographic areas of implementation. Currently, AVSI maintains a geographic presence in an area of both chronic and acute food insecurity and high levels of refugee outflow as well as in an area with one of the highest rates of intercommunal violence, including cattle raids and revenge killings, in the country.

AVSI seeks a DAT that is capable of providing intensive background research and critical analysis of primary and secondary data in support of project design, current and future field research, and ongoing project implementation. This may range from addressing more traditional challenges of international development within a humanitarian crisis to supporting active field assessments within a rapidly evolving humanitarian crisis. AVSI seeks a DAT with strong qualitative research skills as well as high degrees of flexibility and independence. Below are three tentative projects under consideration for the DAT. AVSI proposes that the DAT undertake two of the three listed following a discussion between client and DAT.

 Initial Ideas and Options

Intercommunal Violence: Cattle Raiding and Revenge-Killing

  1. Stand-alone Report

    1. Literature Review: East African and South Sudanese intercommunal violence with an emphasis on cattle raiding

    2. Case Studies: What has worked and not worked in other countries in terms of reducing the frequency and lethality of raids for cattle and revenge

      1. Kenya, Uganda, and Ethiopia as possible case studies

    3. Secondary Research to Support Planned Primary Research

      1. The Dinka Gok of Cuiebet County, Lakes State, South Sudan

Definition of Success

The team should develop clear, thoughtful, well-organized and actionable research on the relevant themes that will impact AVSI’s practice.

Development Advisory Team

Final Report

Absenteeism in Health and Education - AVSI (Fall 2016)

Absenteeism in Health and Education - AVSI (Fall 2016)

Client Profile

Currently operating in 30 countries, AVSI specializes in education, with deep experience in primary education in a wide array of global contexts, including complex and other emergencies. More broadly, AVSI boasts a record of demonstrated efficacy in both development and humanitarianism, including peacebuilding, water and sanitation, health, nutrition, and food security and livelihoods. Formulated over more than 40 years of development practice, the AVSI methodology is informed by Catholic Social Teachings as well as extensive organizational experience.

AVSI established a permanent presence in South Sudan in 2005 after over a decade of implementing cross-border projects from northern Uganda. It first established a field office in Ikwoto County, Eastern Equatoria State (EES), before consolidating its presence in EES with a field office in the state capital, Torit, in 2009. An administrative office in Juba followed in 2011 and a third field office in Cueibet County, Lakes State opened in 2014. In each location, AVSI has followed in the footsteps of the Catholic Church, leasing Diocesan property and, in two field offices, taking over compounds and programming previously managed by the Comboni Missionaries.

Definition of Problem

South Sudan has been a humanitarian emergency since civil war broke out between competing government factions in December 2013. In this moment, AVSI’s mission and portfolio in South Sudan remains heavily focused on long-term development activities. Given the emergency context, including the violence of July, 2016 and the ongoing aftermath, AVSI is seeking to continue improving its development work within a complex operating environment as well as address critical humanitarian needs in its geographic areas of implementation. Currently, AVSI maintains a geographic presence in an area of both chronic and acute food insecurity and high levels of refugee outflow as well as in an area with one of the highest rates of intercommunal violence, including cattle raids and revenge killings, in the country.

AVSI seeks a DAT that is capable of providing intensive background research and critical analysis of primary and secondary data in support of project design, current and future field research, and ongoing project implementation. This may range from addressing more traditional challenges of international development within a humanitarian crisis to supporting active field assessments within a rapidly evolving humanitarian crisis. AVSI seeks a DAT with strong qualitative research skills as well as high degrees of flexibility and independence. Below are three tentative projects under consideration for the DAT. AVSI proposes that the DAT undertake two of the three listed following a discussion between client and DAT.

Initial Ideas and Options

Absenteeism in Health and Education

  1. Classic Development Challenge – Key staff not showing up to work and undercutting service delivery and public trust

    1. Literature Review – synthesize the latest extant literature and provide an overview of bright spots backed by rigorous evidence

    2. Policy Memo – Provided a detailed contextual analysis, propose adaptations for existing projects, large and small, based upon the literature review

Definition of Success

The team should develop clear, thoughtful, well-organized and actionable research on the relevant themes that will impact AVSI’s practice.

 

Development Advisory Team

Final Report

Developing a National Surgical Plan - Lancet Zambia (Fall 2016)

Developing a National Surgical Plan - Lancet Zambia (Fall 2016)

Client Profile

Universal access to safe, affordable surgical and anesthesia care when needed saves lives, prevents disability, and promotes economic growth. In January 2014, President of the World Bank, Dr. Jim Yong Kim, called for a “shared vision and strategy for global equity in essential surgical care,” stating “surgery is an indivisible, indispensable part of health care.” This call came at a pivotal time for global health. As focus transitions from the Millennium Development Goals (MDGS) to a set of Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), commitments to Universal Health Coverage (UHC), and a broader focus on building resilient health systems, the global community must develop strategies to reach these new aims.

Global Surgery 2030, the landmark initial report of The Lancet Commission on Global Surgery, describes the role of surgical and anesthesia care in improving the health of individuals and the economic productivity of countries. Developed by a multidisciplinary team of 25 commissioners and collaborators from over 110 nations, the report presents findings on the state of surgical care in low-income and middle-income countries (LMICs), as well as a framework of recommendations, indicators and targets needed to achieve the Commission’s vision of universal access to safe, affordable surgical and anesthesia care when needed.

Definition of Problem

Developing surgical systems, like any global health endeavor, can present unique challenges. These challenges need not be met in isolation- learning from successes and failures in other parts of the world can strengthen the impact of individual efforts and accelerate global progress. The Lancet Commission on Global Surgery aims to create new material for mutual learning, and has been working with a series of universities, including Notre Dame, to do so.

Zambia is one of the first countries that has partnered with the Lancet Commission on Global Surgery to design and implement a contextually-tailored National Surgical and Anesthesia Plan based off the framework developed by the commission. The Ministry of Health intends to incorporate this National Surgical and Anesthesia Plan into their overarching 5-year Zambian Health Strategic Plan generated for 2017-2021.  There is a unique opportunity to develop a teaching case on the Zambian experience – that explores both the advances and challenges – as it develops its national surgical plan.

 Initial Ideas and Options

Definition of Success

Develop a 8-12 page teaching case with additional exhibits that document the development of Zambia’s national surgical plan in an interesting and engaging fashion, that could be used as a teaching case, exploring challenges and opportunities, especially for other countries considering such a plan.

 

Development Advisory Team

Final Report

Rendering Accompaniment Visible - Partners in Health (Fall 2016)

Rendering Accompaniment Visible - Partners in Health (Fall 2016)

Client Profile

Partners In Health (PIH) was originally founded as a community health project in Haiti in 1987 and has since expanded to sites in a dozen countries. The main goals of the organization are to provide quality health care to those most in need, while working to alleviate the causes of disease and to share lessons more broadly. PIH partners with governments to build effective health systems, as well as works to train members of the local community.  The great majority of the 13,000 people who work for PIH are community health workers typically called accompagnateurs – “those who accompany.” This approach is deeply informed by Catholic Social Teaching and the work of Fr. Gustavo Gutierrez.  PIH’s approach to service through accompaniment is a vision shared by an increasing number of development organizations, among them the Association of Volunteers in International Service (AVSI), Catholic Relief Services, and Caritas International.

Definition of Problem

How do we render more visible the concept and work of Accompaniment? Over the past two years, the Kellogg Institute has organized a project called “From Aid to Accompaniment” to explore and enhance the understanding of the concept of accompaniment. Public Affairs will publish a book on accompaniment in the spring 2017.  The lead author is Dr. Paul Farmer, and Steve Reifenberg and Jennie Block are co-editors. The title will be (something like) “A Partnership with the Poor: A Radical New Vision for More Effective Aid, Philanthropy, and Services.” The launching the book in spring 2017 provides a unique opportunity to raise awareness about the accompaniment concept. There will likely a book conference at ND in the fall 2017. The DAT will have access to manuscript as well as other related materials.

 Initial Ideas and Options

  • Review the Kellogg Institute’s existing work on accompaniment http://kellogg.nd.edu/events/calendar/spring2016/accompaniment.shtml and the previous DAT projects through the International Development in Practice class https://intdev.squarespace.com/partners-in-health/  

  • Survey "what works" to build the understanding and practice of accompaniment by health care providers- what is being done to teach and foster accompaniment as a practice and value right now in current education programs?  Speak with health care educators, curriculum designers and others who are training practitioners in the field.

  • Explore the multiplicity of ways to share awareness and expand engagement of accompaniment through social media, film, advocacy campaigns, leadership development, etc. Think creatively. One past DAT developed a curriculum on accompaniment for GlobeMed, while another explored lessons from successful social movements.

  • Imagine the concept of accompaniment serving as a feature of training and leadership development programs, exploring ways the practice of accompaniment is teachable and provides a pragmatic approach to implementing patient-centered thinking, community/family engagement, local empowerment and long term, sustainable health care improvement and systems change.

  • How can the forthcoming book, conference, and related activities engage people in thinking about and better understanding accompaniment?

 

Development Advisory Team

Final Report

Hello, World!

Girls’ Education: Attracting, Engaging, and Building Capacity - Education Bridge (Fall 2016)

Girls’ Education: Attracting, Engaging, and Building Capacity - Education Bridge (Fall 2016)

Client Profile

Education Bridge seeks to create sustainable South Sudanese communities through education and peace building. We believe that education is a reliable bridge to prosperity and autonomy, both for oneself and the community at large. Unfortunately, girls’ education is disfavored in many communities in South Sudan due to cultural perceptions. Without education, girls often end up in poverty and perpetual dependency. In addition, the community is robbed of the skills and talents these girls would have contributed. Beside this problem, education is not affordable for many families, mainly due to poverty. Currently, 51% of the population lives below the poverty line (2016). The organization is committed to promoting education in South Sudan and providing educational opportunities for all, including girls and economically disadvantaged children. 

Definition of Problem

To help further this mission, the organization has built a secondary school in Bor, South Sudan. Greenbelt Academy opens in January 2017. The school will serve grades 9-12. One of the primary areas of focus at the school is to promote girls’ education. Girls’ literacy is alarmingly low in the country, merely at 16%. There are many reasons for these staggering numbers, including:

  • Cultures that undermine the importance of girls’ education

  • Conflict and civil war in the country

  • Perceptions of gender roles among girls and in the general community

  • Poverty

  • Lack of girls’ necessities, such as sanitary pads, in schools

  • Forced child marriage

Keeping these challenges in mind, Education Bridge would like a team of ND students to "look into how we can best succeed in attracting, maintaining & engaging high school-age girls in our school."

Initial Steps and Options

  • Talk to Ngor Majak, founder of Education Bridge in South Sudan and Gracie Watkins, a Education Bridge Advisory member (and former DAT student) to understand more about the problem and explore the context that could help address the issues, including to design a culturally relevant seminar that could be used with girls in South Sudan.

  • We recommend that students start by reviewing challenges to education in general, and especially girls’ education.  Then it would be useful to put this research in the context of South Sudan. With that knowledge, the team can then research bright spots and best practices from other communities that have had similar challenges and from what they did to successfully address those challenges.

Definition of Success

In the end, we would like contextualized recommendations on how Greenbelt Academy can attract, maintain and successfully engage girls’ students in line with best practices globally.

 

 Development Advisory Team

Final Report

 

 

ENHANCING THE IMPACT OF U.S. FOREIGN ASSISTANCE DATA - DIPLOMACY LAB Bangladesh (FALL 2016)

ENHANCING THE IMPACT OF U.S. FOREIGN ASSISTANCE DATA - DIPLOMACY LAB Bangladesh (FALL 2016)

Client Profile

The U.S. is one of the largest donors globally for foreign  assistance. In an effort to bring transparency and accountability to U.S. Foreign Assistance, the Department of State developed the website ForeignAssistance.gov (FA.gov) in 2010. FA.gov makes it possible for anyone to explore how the U.S. government invests its foreign assistance funds in countries around the world through a single website in an accessible and machine-readable format. The website includes detailed foreign assistance financial, award, and performance data from agencies across the U.S. government that implement foreign assistance activities. It provides information on U.S. efforts on issues such as health, peace and security, democracy, environment, and humanitarian/emergency assistance. Users can explore the data in multiple ways, through an interactive map, pre-defined charts and graphs, downloadable datasets, and XML files prepared in the International Aid Transparency Initiative (IATI).

Definition of Problem

It is a Department priority to increase awareness of FA.gov, and to enhance and expand its usability and impact, including by developing cases studies on how to most effectively use the data contained on this site.  We are looking to find ways to appeal to more diverse stakeholders domestically and abroad, drive them to the site, and encourage them to use the data by demonstrating its value.  We are looking to develop an electronic handbook for outreach to various audiences that includes (in priority order) host country government, U.S. federal agencies, civil society organizations, journalists, academic researchers/ university students, donor organizations, and Congress.

Initial Steps and Options

  • The DAT should plan to analyze the ForeignAssistance.gov website and dataset. The team should develop ideas for using the data to identify trends and explore effective ways for people to engage with the data.  

  • We would be particularly interested in exploring specific country case studies for use of the electronic handbook from different regions of the world, and have initially identified three countries -- Haiti, Uganda, and Bangladesh, where we might usefully develop, prototype and use the electronic handbook.

Definition of Success

We are enthusiastic to see models and suggestions presented in an electronic handbook (with case studies from Haiti, Uganda and Bangladesh) that show how FA.gov data can be most successfully used.  This might be combined or analyzed with other datasets and tools in ways to tell a compelling and engaging story on Foreign Assistance or US Diplomacy. It would also be helpful to identify key communications messages to appeal to the identified stakeholders, and develop recommendations to make FA.gov more useful to them.

The Managing Director leading U.S. foreign assistance transparency efforts may be participating as a panelist in the Open Government Partnership Summit in Paris in December 2016. If the DAT project is successful, he would like to share some of the results of the DAT as a way to demonstrate U.S.-led efforts to improving foreign assistance data uptake among diverse stakeholders around the world.

 

Development Advisory Team

Final Report

ENHANCING THE IMPACT OF U.S. FOREIGN ASSISTANCE DATA - DIPLOMACY LAB Uganda (FALL 2016)

ENHANCING THE IMPACT OF U.S. FOREIGN ASSISTANCE DATA - DIPLOMACY LAB Uganda (FALL 2016)

Client Profile

The U.S. is one of the largest donors globally for foreign  assistance. In an effort to bring transparency and accountability to U.S. Foreign Assistance, the Department of State developed the website ForeignAssistance.gov (FA.gov) in 2010. FA.gov makes it possible for anyone to explore how the U.S. government invests its foreign assistance funds in countries around the world through a single website in an accessible and machine-readable format. The website includes detailed foreign assistance financial, award, and performance data from agencies across the U.S. government that implement foreign assistance activities. It provides information on U.S. efforts on issues such as health, peace and security, democracy, environment, and humanitarian/emergency assistance. Users can explore the data in multiple ways, through an interactive map, pre-defined charts and graphs, downloadable datasets, and XML files prepared in the International Aid Transparency Initiative (IATI).

Definition of Problem

It is a Department priority to increase awareness of FA.gov, and to enhance and expand its usability and impact, including by developing cases studies on how to most effectively use the data contained on this site.  We are looking to find ways to appeal to more diverse stakeholders domestically and abroad, drive them to the site, and encourage them to use the data by demonstrating its value.  We are looking to develop an electronic handbook for outreach to various audiences that includes (in priority order) host country government, U.S. federal agencies, civil society organizations, journalists, academic researchers/ university students, donor organizations, and Congress.

Initial Steps and Options

  • The DAT should plan to analyze the ForeignAssistance.gov website and dataset. The team should develop ideas for using the data to identify trends and explore effective ways for people to engage with the data.  

  • We would be particularly interested in exploring specific country case studies for use of the electronic handbook from different regions of the world, and have initially identified three countries -- Haiti, Uganda, and Bangladesh, where we might usefully develop, prototype and use the electronic handbook.

Definition of Success

We are enthusiastic to see models and suggestions presented in an electronic handbook (with case studies from Haiti, Uganda and Bangladesh) that show how FA.gov data can be most successfully used.  This might be combined or analyzed with other datasets and tools in ways to tell a compelling and engaging story on Foreign Assistance or US Diplomacy. It would also be helpful to identify key communications messages to appeal to the identified stakeholders, and develop recommendations to make FA.gov more useful to them.

The Managing Director leading U.S. foreign assistance transparency efforts may be participating as a panelist in the Open Government Partnership Summit in Paris in December 2016. If the DAT project is successful, he would like to share some of the results of the DAT as a way to demonstrate U.S.-led efforts to improving foreign assistance data uptake among diverse stakeholders around the world.

 

Development Advisory Team

Final Report

Enhancing the Impact of U.S. Foreign Assistance Data - Diplomacy Lab Haiti (Fall 2016)

Enhancing the Impact of U.S. Foreign Assistance Data - Diplomacy Lab Haiti (Fall 2016)

Client Profile

The U.S. is one of the largest donors globally for foreign  assistance. In an effort to bring transparency and accountability to U.S. Foreign Assistance, the Department of State developed the website ForeignAssistance.gov (FA.gov) in 2010. FA.gov makes it possible for anyone to explore how the U.S. government invests its foreign assistance funds in countries around the world through a single website in an accessible and machine-readable format. The website includes detailed foreign assistance financial, award, and performance data from agencies across the U.S. government that implement foreign assistance activities. It provides information on U.S. efforts on issues such as health, peace and security, democracy, environment, and humanitarian/emergency assistance. Users can explore the data in multiple ways, through an interactive map, pre-defined charts and graphs, downloadable datasets, and XML files prepared in the International Aid Transparency Initiative (IATI).

Definition of Problem

It is a Department priority to increase awareness of FA.gov, and to enhance and expand its usability and impact, including by developing cases studies on how to most effectively use the data contained on this site.  We are looking to find ways to appeal to more diverse stakeholders domestically and abroad, drive them to the site, and encourage them to use the data by demonstrating its value.  We are looking to develop an electronic handbook for outreach to various audiences that includes (in priority order) host country government, U.S. federal agencies, civil society organizations, journalists, academic researchers/ university students, donor organizations, and Congress.

Initial Steps and Options

  • The DAT should plan to analyze the ForeignAssistance.gov website and dataset. The team should develop ideas for using the data to identify trends and explore effective ways for people to engage with the data.  

  • We would be particularly interested in exploring specific country case studies for use of the electronic handbook from different regions of the world, and have initially identified three countries -- Haiti, Uganda, and Bangladesh, where we might usefully develop, prototype and use the electronic handbook.

Definition of Success

We are enthusiastic to see models and suggestions presented in an electronic handbook (with case studies from Haiti, Uganda and Bangladesh) that show how FA.gov data can be most successfully used.  This might be combined or analyzed with other datasets and tools in ways to tell a compelling and engaging story on Foreign Assistance or US Diplomacy. It would also be helpful to identify key communications messages to appeal to the identified stakeholders, and develop recommendations to make FA.gov more useful to them.

The Managing Director leading U.S. foreign assistance transparency efforts may be participating as a panelist in the Open Government Partnership Summit in Paris in December 2016. If the DAT project is successful, he would like to share some of the results of the DAT as a way to demonstrate U.S.-led efforts to improving foreign assistance data uptake among diverse stakeholders around the world.

 

Development Advisory Team

Final Report

Enhancing Effective Learning Loops - Enseña Chile (Fall 2016)

Enhancing Effective Learning Loops - Enseña Chile (Fall 2016)

Client Profile

Enseña Chile is based on the successful Teach for America model, recognized for creating a corps of leaders committed to improving access to excellent education regardless of socio-economic circumstances. Many join straight after finishing college, but others have gathered professional experiences outside the education sector. All applicants need to have demonstrated skills in leading and motivating teams, such as campus initiatives, community organizations or sports teams. Enseña Chile was founded by Tomás Recart in 2007 in Santiago, Chile. The organization provides quality education to 14- to 18-year-old high school students by bringing outstanding university graduates with leadership skills into classrooms of low-quality schools in poor areas for a period of two years. 

Definition of Problem

Enseña Chile provides quality education to 14 to 18 year old high-school students by bringing outstanding university graduates with leadership skills into classrooms of schools in poor areas for a period of two years. Enseña Chile founder Tomas Recart is convinced that to achieve social and economic equality it is necessary to systematically incorporate new leadership into the educational system, and build broad and diverse networks in doing so. Enseña Chile is based on the Teach for America model, recognized for creating a corps of leaders committed to improving access to excellent education regardless of socio-economic circumstances. Many teachers join Enseña Chile straight after finishing college, but others gain professional experiences before working as teachers. All applicants need to have demonstrated skills in leading and motivating teams, such as campus initiatives, community organizations or sports teams. On a long-term basis Enseña Chile is promoting a movement/network of Enseña Chile alumni who will form a critical mass and serve in key leadership positions in society to positively influence change in Chile’s educational system, providing opportunities to bridge Chile’s enormous inequality gap.

Enseña Chile began with 29 teachers in 3 regions in 2009 and today in 2016 has 191 teachers in 8 of the 15 regions of Chile.  This growth has led to the current need to establish more systematic processes and protocols to ensure regular analysis and sharing of key data (such as the student/classroom impact measurements, teacher satisfaction surveys, principals and school administration surveys, alumni impact, etc.) Working with “Learning Loops,” we have identified these cycles, but have struggled to implement clear and concise processes with responsibilities for each step.

Initial Steps and Options

  • Contact members of former ND Enseña Chile DATs who have successfully worked with the organization in the past (some who now serve as part of an Enseña Chile international advisory board).

  • Identify the experiences of relevant non-profits around the globe who do an excellent job sharing data and information on their work and building community with key shareholders.

  • Compare Enseña Chile’s use and sharing of data (including its Learning Loop cycle) with other relevant non-profits.

Definition of Success

  • Informed by best practices of other relevant organizations, design a process for the 2017 academic year that allows relevant stakeholders of the organization (from teachers in the classroom to our CEO, including Regional Managers, staff members, the board of directors, principals and students) to be informed of the status of each instrument and its progress.  Ensure that this process allows them to have a say in analyzing the data and proposing changes and strategies for the future in a timely manner. 

  • For example, this might be a coherent framework (with suggested documentation, diagrams and dashboards) that can help the organization to learn and improve from the current cycle of “Capturing Data > Analyzing Results > Establishing insights or strategies > Sharing results > Executing proposed actions and Repeating,” Propose effective ways of keeping track of each of these stages, linked to the framework of Enseña Chile’s yearly schedule.

Development Advisory Team

Final Report

A Force for Good: Human-Centered Design at Notre Dame (Spring 2016)

A Force for Good: Human-Centered Design at Notre Dame (Spring 2016)

Client Profile:

The University of Notre Dame is a Catholic academic community of higher learning, animated from its origins by the Congregation of Holy Cross. The University seeks to cultivate in its students not only an appreciation for the great achievements of human beings but also a disciplined sensibility to the poverty, injustice and oppression that burden the lives of so many. The aim is to create a sense of human solidarity and concern for the common good that will bear fruit as learning becomes service to justice.

In spring semester 2016, a group of students from International Development in Practice II served as consultants to Deans of the College of Arts and Letters, College of Engineering, and the new Keough School of Global Affairs on the initiative of human-centered design. Their work has become a cornerstone for the macro movement at Notre Dame of bringing innovation, cross-discipline collaboration, and design thinking to the forefront of the University's mission to serve as a force for good.

 

Recommendation:

Presentation

Team Biography

Assessing and Developing Usability for Foreign Aid Data - Diplomacy Lab (Fall 2015)

Assessing and Developing Usability for Foreign Aid Data - Diplomacy Lab (Fall 2015)

Client Profile

The U.S. is one of the largest donors globally for foreign assistance. In an effort to bring transparency & accountability to U.S. Foreign Assistance, the Department of State manages and coordinates the website ForeignAssistance.gov (FA.gov).

FA.gov currently provides budget, financial, and programmatic data from across ten agencies (representing 98% of the total foreign assistance portfolio) that are contributing to U.S. efforts on issues such as health, peace and security, democracy, environment, and humanitarian/emergency assistance. The site includes many different data elements including activity titles, descriptions, partner names, dates of performance, and locations.

Definition of Problem

The site is finalizing a complete redesign, with new interfaces and functionalities, and we want to develop and use cases for the data contained on this site. We are asking universities to review the information in the dataset and develop ideas on how to use the data to identify trends and draw conclusions. Universities can also take on projects to standardize or hack the data to improve the quality, i.e. standardizing vendor names (for example, MSF vs. Doctors without Borders vs Medicines Sans Frontieres).

Initial Steps and Options

The DAT should plan to analyze the ForeignAssistance.gov dataset. The team would develop ideas for using the data to identify trends and explore ways to compare, contrast, or combine data with other datasets. For example, the team might seek to link the data to the new Lives Saved Scorecard, pioneered by U.N. special envoy Ray Chambers, for financing the health MDGs. The team will most likely focus on data from one specific country or region.

Definition of Success

The Diplomacy Lab is enthusiastic to see projects that show how FA.gov data can be combined or analyzed with other datasets to tell a story on Foreign Assistance or US Diplomacy. Foreign Assistance data can be used in its entirety or segmented by country, agency, or sector

Recommendation

Presenation


Healthcare Delivery Expansion in Rural Mexico - Partners in Health (Fall 2015)

Healthcare Delivery Expansion in Rural Mexico - Partners in Health (Fall 2015)

Client Profile

Partners in Health (PIH) is a global healthcare NGO founded in 1987 to provide a preferential option for the poor in healthcare. The organization originally developed as a community health project in Haiti and has since expanded to several countries around the world—Mexico being one of the most recent in 2012.  In Mexico, PIH operates through its sister organization, Compañeros en Salud (CES).  CES partners directly with the Mexican government to strengthen healthcare delivery in the rural state of Chiapas (the southernmost and poorest state in Mexico) by providing mentorship to recently graduated Mexican medical students serving in primary health clinics, training community health workers to support chronic diseases patients, and accompanying patients requiring higher level care as they navigate the health system.  

Definition of Problem

A young organization, CES is still working to develop new programs and expand its existing services in order to better deliver care to rural communities in Chiapas.  Beginning in 2012 with clinics in just two communities, the organization now operates clinics in ten communities and supports community health workers in six.  For many years, it was nearly impossible to find medical doctors to serve the rural clinics in Chiapas. Today, CES’s global health education model attracts medical students from top medical schools throughout all of Mexico.  Through its “Right to Health” reference program, CES is able to assist patients requiring more specialized attention beyond just primary care coverage.  Given the diversity of these operations, there are many paths for CES to pursue in the future, and it is still uncertain where the organization should best invest its resources to maximize impact.  CES would like to work with a Development Advisory Team to investigate and evaluate different strategic options for the organization’s future.

 Initial Ideas and Options

  • Explore the costs and the benefits of options such as:
    • Expanding the number of clinics supported in Chiapas
    • Expanding the types of health coverage provided
    • Expanding services to another state in Mexico
    • Increasing focus on the policy level
    • Increasing focus on medical education
  • Work closely with CES staff to understand the organization and its current operations.
  • Identify organizations that have faced similar dilemmas in expansion and development.  Write short case studies that draw lessons from those experiences.

Definition of Success

 A systematic report exploring options for CES’s future activities, based on evaluation of each of the above potential options and comparative analysis of similar organizations, that helps us to understand how each strategy would increase our impact, and provide the basis for dialogue within the organization to consider these strategic options.

Recommendation 

Presentation

Report